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  • Ed Macias stepping down

    After 25 years serving as provost, Edward S. Macias, PhD, will be stepping down as the chief academic officer of the university, effective June 30, 2013. (James Byard)

  • Ed Macias stepping down

    From 1994–2008, Ed Macias (near center, in red) was dean of Arts & Sciences (he was also concurrently provost from 1988–95; he maintained the duties of chief academic officer as the executive vice chancellor from 1995–2008). (WUSTL Archives)

  • Ed Macias stepping down

    Ed Macias joined Washington University as an assistant professor of chemistry in 1970. In 1984, he became chair of the department. (WUSTL Archives)

University Feature

Changing of the Guard

Top academic officer Macias steps down, will focus on educational technologies.
Edward S. Macias, PhD, the chief academic officer at Washington University for
the past 25 years, will step down from his position as ­provost and executive vice chancellor at the end of the academic year, on June 30, 2013.

“Ed has led many important efforts that have strengthened the quality of our ­faculty, expanded our academic programs, enhanced the diversity of our community, and ­enriched the overall academic experience of our students.” — Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton

“Ed has led many important efforts that have strengthened the quality of our ­faculty, expanded our academic programs, enhanced the diversity of our community, and ­enriched the overall academic experience of our students,” Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton says. “He has been a trusted adviser and friend, and I am grateful for the guidance he has provided to my colleagues and me during his impressive career.”

Macias, the Barbara and David Thomas ­Distinguished Professor in Arts & ­Sciences, joined the university in 1970 as assistant ­professor of chemistry in Arts & Sciences. He served in ­various positions including ­professor and chair of the Department of ­Chemistry, ­director of the summer school, and dean of Arts & Sciences.

During a year’s sabbatical, ­Chancellor ­Wrighton has tapped Macias to lead an ­effort to explore the university’s approach to ­online ­education and seek to better leverage ­advances in educational technologies to enhance ­Washington University’s reach and impact.

Here, we celebrate Macias’ ­university career with a look at some of the changes the campus has seen since his arrival.

Number of Danforth Campus Faculty Members

1970 – 531
2013 – 658

Number of Danforth Campus Full-time Students

1970 – 6,682
2013 – 11,700

Number of Undergraduate Majors

1970 – 47
2013 – 82

Number of Danforth Campus Buildings (program growth)

1970 – 44
2013 – 118

Library Volume Holdings

1970 – 100,000+
20134,484,590

UNIVERSITY FEATURES:

Committed to ActionClinton Global Initiative University students gathered at Washington University April 5–7 to fine-tune their plans for tackling some of society’s most urgent challenges.
[Sidebar]
Q&A: Clinton and Wrighton talk service, funding, impact [Sidebar]
Turning ideas into action: ingenuity & creativity key to student commitments

Cosmic Research in AntarcticaWUSTL researchers travel to remote Antarctica to conduct balloon-borne astronomy experiments to solve the mysteries of cosmic rays.

Changing of the GuardAfter 25 years, top academic officer Ed Macias steps down; going forward, he will focus on educational technologies.

ALUMNI FEATURE:

The Road Less TraveledWashington University grads have the confidence to pursue their dreams — even if those dreams don’t quite mesh with their majors.

TABLE OF CONTENTS


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